Posts in Dr. Joseph P. Iser
Preparing for a Pandemic - Then and Now

One hundred years ago another wave of the deadly 1918 flu pandemic was peaking in the United States. This second highly fatal wave struck between September and November and was responsible for most of the deaths attributed to the pandemic. It was also during this time that the New York City Board of Health added flu to its list of reportable diseases and required all cases of influenza be isolated at home or in a city hospital.

Read More
2017-2018 Influenza Season

Nationally, the flu season peaked in early February with influenza A(H3) viruses being the predominant strains reported for the overall season. However, beginning in March influenza B strains were reported more commonly than A viruses. It is not unusual for there to be a second, lower wave of influenza activity later in the season. At the local level, the Southern Nevada Health District’s season mirrored national activity with cases beginning to decline shortly after the first of the year and more influenza B viruses being reported later in the season. 

Read More
Wanted: Leaders for a TB-Free United States.

Every year on March 24 the health care community commemorates World TB Day to bring attention to a preventable disease that still impacts many people in the United States and around the world. This year’s theme is “Wanted: Leaders for a TB-Free United States. We can make history. End TB.” It is a call for health care partners to work together on a local, national, and international scale to eliminate the disease.

Read More
Preventing and controlling influenza - February SNHD Update

After the first of the year, flu activity increased throughout most of the United States and reports questioning the effectiveness of this year’s flu vaccine were widespread in the media. Many of these reports were based on Australia’s interim estimate of the vaccine’s benefit against one flu virus (H3N2) that circulated during past flu seasons. Because vaccine effectiveness cannot be accurately predicted during a current season, it is too soon to evaluate this year’s match to the strains of flu currently circulating. However, last season’s vaccine effectiveness in the United States was estimated at 39 percent, and the effectiveness against H3N2 viruses was only slightly lower at 32 percent. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) believes that these estimates are better at forecasting the flu vaccine benefits for the United States. This is assuming there are minimal changes to the current viruses that are circulating. 

Read More