CCMS Member Dr. Deborah Kuhls calls for public health approach to gun violence in CNN interview

 
Dr. Deborah Kuhls on CNN 11/20/18

Dr. Deborah Kuhls on CNN 11/20/18

In an interview with CNN on November 20, Dr. Deborah Kuhls called for a public health approach to the issue of gun violence in the United States.

“We’ve made great progress in decreasing the number of people who die from motor vehicle crashes,” Dr. Kuhls said. “We can use the same public health approach to address firearm injuries and deaths.”

Dr. Kuhls, a professor of trauma and critical care in the UNLV School of Medicine as well as the medical director of the University Medical Center’s Trauma Intensive Care Unit was on duty the night of October 1, 2018 when Las Vegas had the deadliest mass shooting in modern American History. During her interview with CNN, Dr. Kuhls expressed how she avoids gettting frustrated with the rising number of mass shootings and gunshot victims.

“I am really activated,” Dr. Kuhls said. “I don’t feel like I need to throw up my hands. I’m very active in the American College of Surgeons, and we have been trying to address this issue for many years but particularly the last 4 years.”

Many physicians across the country have taken to social media in light of a comment from the National Rifle Association that they should “stay in their lane” when it comes to gun violence, prompting an online movement of surgeons posting pictures of their bloodied operating rooms with the hashtag #ThisIsOurLane.

“This is a public health crisis,” Dr. Kuhls said. “30,000 Americans die every year -- children, adults, the elderly. We expect firearm deaths to exceed motor vehicle deaths.”

Dr. Jeffrey Roth teaching a Stop the Bleed Course for the community and medical students from Touro University Nevada & UNLV School of Medicine

Dr. Jeffrey Roth teaching a Stop the Bleed Course for the community and medical students from Touro University Nevada & UNLV School of Medicine

As part of their work to address this important issue, Dr. Kuhls and her colleagues help run Stop the Bleed training seminars, a program with the goal of training every American in basic bleeding control techniques while also working to place bleeding control kits in public venues.

For more information about Stop the Bleed programs or trainings in Southern Nevada, contact the Clark County Medical Society at info@clarkcountymedical.org or at (702) 739-9989.